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Professor calls foreign student a ‘low animal’

A Korean professor has been captured on film scolding two Indonesian exchange students, calling one “not human” and “a low animal.”

The online video shows the professor at Gyeongsang National University in Jinju, South Gyeongsang Province, berating two female students from Indonesia for not attending his classes, as well as threatening to call the police and cancel their master’s degrees. Noting one section of the video that skips, some YouTube users commented that the footage may have been edited.

Elvira Fidelia Tanjung, one of the students, filmed the incident outside her college accommodation on March 4. She uploaded it on The Indonesian Students Association channel on South Korea’s YouTube on April 9.

Tanjung and the second student in the video, Merisha Hastarina, have both since returned to Indonesia.

Tanjung said the incident occurred about a week after the department had told her and Hastarina they could not receive their master’s certificates at their graduation ceremony because the professor wished to give it to them directly after he returned from a conference in Japan.

Feeling that it was unfair that the rest of her class could receive their certificates at graduation, Tanjung went to the graduate office and asked to see her parchment to take a photo for her family. She took then took the certificate from the office without permission.

She and Hastarina spent the next week avoiding attempts by the college to contact them about the certificate and their whereabouts.

“We were not sleeping at our home at that time because we were really scared at that time, maybe he would call the immigration office, he might say we were stealing something,” she said.

Tanjung claimed that the professor, who teaches at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, had previously expressed doubts about her graduating and had given her three papers to complete about a month before the ceremony.

“Before my graduation, he was always telling me, ‘you are not graduating this time, you are not going to graduate this semester, I am not sure about your skill, your ability,’” she said.

The two students also claimed they were forced to credit the professor’s son, a student at Pusan National University, as a co-author on a number of their papers despite him having no involvement.

When contacted by The Korea Herald, the professor declined to apologize or express regret for his choice of words, again using “animal” to refer to the students.

He said the remark was intended to describe someone who did not keep their agreements.

The professor claimed they had wanted to extend their visas after graduation for research but then did not submit academic papers and had failed to produce receipts for a trip to Japan funded by his foundation. He said he visited the women’s accommodation after being unable to contact them for a week to get a form for their visa extension.

“(I said) they should submit the official (visa extension recommendation) sheet to our university (but) they didn’t submit the official sheet, so I went to visit them and then I told them to submit the official sheet, that’s all,” he said.

The professor, who heads the BK 21 foundation that paid part of the students’ tuition, also said the students’ papers had been largely copied from his son’s.

He added that he believed they had “planned this manipulation from the start.”

Lee Jae-yun at the university’s graduate school office confirmed the students had fulfilled all academic obligations to graduate and now held master’s degrees.

He said the university was investigating the incident captured on film and the claims that the professor forced his students to credit his son on their papers.

“We formed an investigative committee on April 12 to look into the case and if the results show that any law was broken appropriate action will be taken,” said Lee.

He also confirmed the professor had asked for the students’ certificate to be withheld in violation of normal procedure.

Sara Rai, manager of the Korea International Student Support Association, said cases of professors abusing foreign students were common.

She disclosed the testimony of two foreign exchange students at different colleges who complained of being cursed at, having objects thrown at them and being scolded for hours on end by professors.

Neither student was willing to give their name to KISSA.

“There are many students like them who choose not to talk or seek help but silently suffer so as not to endanger their prospect of getting their hard-earned master’s or Ph.D.,” said Rai.

Ward spins biracial roots into blessing

Updated 4/10/2006 6:43 PM ET
By Paul Wiseman, USA TODAY
SEOUL, South Korea — At school, they taunted him for his looks — half-black, half-Asian. "Jackie Chan!" they'd say. "Bruce Lee-roy!" At home, he didn't understand why his mother struggled with English, couldn't help him with his homework and made him take his shoes off before he walked in the door.
"I was a lost child," Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward says. "I wasn't accepted in the black community because I was Korean, and I wasn't accepted in the Korean community because I was black." He blamed his Korean mother for the teasing he got on the playground in suburban Atlanta. "I was ashamed of the person who instilled everything in me. I let the kids get the better half of me."

How different things are now. Ward, 30, describes his childhood while relaxing in the $6,300-a-night Royal Suite in Seoul's Lotte Hotel. His mother, Kim Young-hee, sits proudly beside him on an overstuffed couch, sunlight streaming through a window that offers a glorious view of the Seoul skyline and the mountains behind it.

Ward made it through adolescence, through the University of Georgia and into the NFL. He's a four-time Pro Bowl wide receiver and MVP of Super Bowl XL. His five catches for 123 yards and a touchdown led the Steelers to a 21-10 championship victory against the Seattle Seahawks in Detroit on Feb. 5.

Last week, he and the divorced mother who worked three jobs to support him returned in triumph to the country where he was born. He credits her for his transformation from confused, angry adolescent to confident NFL star. "She gave up so much," he says. "It's a great success story."

His mom still works at a high school cafeteria in suburban Atlanta; she tried retirement but gave up after two months.

Ward and his mother have been welcomed as heroes in South Korea, where kids like him — children of Korean women and American GIs — have been treated as pariahs, shunned, ridiculed and locked out of the best jobs and schools.

On this trip, Ward has met the president, thrown out the first pitch at a baseball game and endured camera crews hounding his every step as he tries to tour the city of his birth. At a news conference at the Lotte Hotel last Tuesday, 200 reporters and photographers filled a meeting hall with a capacity for 130, yelling at each other and jostling for position.

Ward even canceled some planned stops to escape. "It's been wild," he says. "I knew it was going to be crazy. But it's pandemonium crazy. I didn't know that."

The adulation is a little awkward. Ward knows if he'd grown up as a half-black child in South Korea he likely would have been relegated to a second-class existence. His Korean mother knows it too. She chose a tough, lonely life in the USA to spare him the ordeal.

"I enjoy the Korean community support," Ward says. "My mom is still leery: 'Is it because he's MVP, or do you really accept him?' "

Ward has teamed with Pearl S. Buck International, a Bucks County, Pa., organization, to support mixed-race children in South Korea. He's hoping his story will encourage South Koreans to show more tolerance. "They didn't have a choice to come into this world as a biracial kid," he says. "If you can welcome me — a guy who doesn't speak the language — you can do it for them."

South Korea's 5,000 Amerasian children born since the Korean War have struggled to fit into a society that takes prickly pride in its 99%-plus ethnic homogeneity.

Teased and bullied, 9.4% of Amerasian children drop out of elementary school; another 17.5% quit middle school, according to Pearl S. Buck International. As adults, more than 45% are unemployed or work odd jobs to get by, the Buck organization says.

Seven-year-old Ahn Arum, daughter of a Seoul woman and an absentee American father, refuses to study Korean at school. "She doesn't know why she should read Korean. She doesn't feel Korean," says her mother, Ahn Jin-hee, 29. "The boys tease her. They say she has curly hair; she is black; she is smelly. (Even) my parents didn't want to take their granddaughter outside because it was disgraceful."

Kim Su-bin, 20, says she goes to the salon every three months to straighten her curly hair, evidence that her absentee father is black. Just in case, she wears an Adidas cap: "I want to hide my frizzy hair."

For outcasts such as Ahn Arum and Kim Su-bin, Ward's celebrity is a godsend. Suddenly, their neighbors and classmates are rethinking their attitudes. "This Hines Ward phenomenon is very positive," says Seoul resident Jung Young-ja, 72. "We've been proud of our homogenous society. It's time to change."

South Korea has little choice: Already more than 10% of South Koreans marry foreigners — mostly brides imported from poorer Asian countries. The country has 35,000 "Kosians," offspring of a Korean and a parent from elsewhere in Asia; they are expected to emerge as a voting bloc over the next two decades, says Song Young-sun, a South Korean legislator.

So Ward is helping prepare South Korea for its multicultural future: "That guy has no idea how much good he's doing," says Janet Mintzer, president of Pearl S. Buck International.

Ward was born March 8, 1976. A year later, his American GI father took his Korean bride and his young son back to the USA. But the marriage quickly disintegrated. A court, convinced Kim Young-hee didn't have the language or job skills to support a child, gave custody to Ward's father.

But Kim didn't give up. She stayed in the USA, working three jobs and saving everything she could. When Ward was 7 or 8 years old, he came to live with her. The change was traumatic: He was moving from an all-black neighborhood to a mixed-race community in suburban Atlanta and into a household where he and his mother could barely communicate.

Ward excelled in athletics but still struggled to find an identity between two cultures. When he was a teenager, Kim recalls, Korean neighbors recruited him to join their basketball team for a tournament and excluded him from the celebration afterward. "They used him," she says. "I cussed them out."

Kim knew nothing about football during Ward's high school career — even when some of the top college coaches came calling, trying to woo the star from Forest Park High School. "Tom Osborne, Lou Holtz, Bobby Bowden were in our living room," Ward says. "My mom didn't know who they were."

Kim may not have known the big names or understood the X's and O's, but her values influenced the way her son played football. "You've got to be humble," she says. Sure enough, Ward won't take running plays off the way some star wide receivers do; he's a ferocious blocker. And his mom better not see him dancing after a touchdown. "I tell him don't do it," she says. "I can't stand it."

Over time, she's become a football fan. "She's like a coach now," Ward sighs. " 'You didn't do this. You dropped the ball. You should have gone for two points.' "

Kim didn't attend the Super Bowl, preferring to watch it at home with friends. She didn't want to miss the replays. When Ward called her after his MVP performance, she was fast asleep. She had to get up at 5 a.m. to go to her job in the school cafeteria.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/steelers/2006-04-09-ward-focus_x.htm?POE=SPOISVA
Hines Ward’s Story to Air on Super Bowl Pre-Game Show
http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/nation/200701/kt2007012419112452910.htm


discrimination hell

The internet list also includes "discrimination hell." In Korean society today,
there are numerous explicit discriminations against race, sex, age and class in all aspects of life.
There are also rather implicit discriminations against the schools you graduated from or your hometown.
Another type of subtle discrimination is the one against people who are different from us:
"If you are not one of us, you will be excluded."
This jingoistic attitude can be easily extended to newcomers, outsiders and foreigners.
http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/SITE/data/html_dir/2007/01/24/200701240036.asp


Foreigners in Busan busted

for ‘anti-Korean’ performance
The group of English teachers who put on Babo-palooza!, a sketch comedy show on December 1 and 2 here in Busan, were brought in for questioning (and released) early this week by the International Crimes Division for violating Immigration and Criminal Law. Pusanweb will be bringing you regular updates and hopefully a Webcast as the situation unfolds. You can also read about the story in the Korean media and in the Blogs.
http://www.pusanweb.com/node/158
http://www.rjkoehler.com/2006/12/15/foreigners-in-busan-busted-for-anti-korean-performance/
http://www.efl-law.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=586
http://blog.360.yahoo.com/blog-KiAu3KAib6ODMgYipziQemMEhw--?cq=1&p=198

False information is plentiful too.

One Vietnamese woman who married a Korean man through an international agency said,
``At the meeting, I was told that my husband was an office worker with a monthly salary of more than 2 million won.
However, after the marriage I came to know that he was a low-paid irregular worker at construction sites.
He was also married to a Mongolian woman before, which I was not informed of.’’

After they come to Korea being married to a Korean man, the women often face violence and get harsh treatments by their husbands even if they arrive in Korea.

One woman said, ``Upon arriving in Korea, my husband took away passport and would strangle me.
I am so scared of my husband. Another woman said, ``I was beat up after three days after I entered the country.
As my husband demanded sex after drinking, I said no.
Then he would beat me and spit in my face, pulling my hair.’’
http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/200611/kt2006111219230710160.htm

Racial Discrimination

Sadly we have received many reports of Teachers arriving at Incheon (Korea) International Airport
following being hired from their home country and as soon as the school owner sees them and sees that they are NOT Caucasian,
the school owner refuses to have anything to do with them - in fact abandoning them in the airport.
http://www.efl-law.com/deceptive_practices.html


yang galbo ("Western whore") yang gongjoo ("Western princess")

By EUNNIE PARK Monday, May 1, 2006
Some women are stared at during church services. Others are pointed at. A few have been called "whore."
They are Korean women who married American soldiers, and are subject to decades-old discrimination born out of the Korean War.
They are associated with poverty and prostitution. They are treated as low-class and uneducated. They are alienated from Korean communities -- in both their homeland and New Jersey.
"Korean people used to look me down ... and question my loyalty and trust," said Namhee Rider of Eatontown,
who came to the United States six years ago with her husband, a former soldier.
The discrimination was brought to the forefront when Pittsburgh Steelers receiver and Super Bowl MVP Hines Ward --
whose mother is Korean and whose father is African-American -- visited his birth country last month.
But many believe those efforts will falter, because the discrimination is long ingrained in the culture.
most women who had relationships with foreigners came from the bottom of the social hierarchy -- poor, uneducated and, sometimes, prostitutes.
Given derogatory labels like yang galbo ("Western whore") or the ironic yang gongjoo ("Western princess"), these women became the iconic representation of all who marry American soldiers,
said Northwestern University Professor Ji-Yeon Yuh, author of "Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America."

"They usually assume that I had suffered a poor family history and have neither proper education nor career," said Rider, 32.
"Some people believe that I married my husband to use him for my 'American Dream.' "
Sometimes, the discrimination has been overt.
http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2OTI4Mzc2JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==


Super Bowl star's return to S. Korea forces debate on race

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- Beaming Kim Gwan-woo couldn't hide his excitement at getting to meet Super Bowl star Hines Ward,
a hero that the 7-year-old Korean boy wants to emulate.

Kim, a second grader who aspires to be a scientist, often comes home from school crying,
taunted by schoolmates shouting racial slurs, said his aunt and guardian, Kim Jae-yon, who runs a small restaurant in central Seoul.

The image of mixed-race Koreans has been negative, as people often associate them with brothels around American military bases.

That view, coupled with an emphasis that South Korea's Confucian-oriented society places on "pure blood" lineage,
has led to lifetime discrimination against those of mixed heritage.
Wednesday, April 12, 2006
http://edition.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/asiapcf/04/11/skorea.ward.ap/

At a news conference at the Lotte Hotel last Tuesday, 200 reporters and photographers filled a meeting hall with a capacity for 130,
yelling at each other and jostling for position.
The adulation is a little awkward.
Ward knows if he'd grown up as a half-black child in South Korea he likely would have been relegated to a second-class existence.
His Korean mother knows it too. She chose a tough, lonely life in the USA to spare him the ordeal.
"I enjoy the Korean community support," Ward says.
"My mom is still leery: 'Is it because he's MVP, or do you really accept him?' "
Ward excelled in athletics but still struggled to find an identity between two cultures.
When he was a teenager, Kim recalls, Korean neighbors recruited him to join their basketball team for a tournament and excluded him from the celebration afterward.
"They used him," she says. "I cussed them out."
South Korea's 5,000 Amerasian children born since the Korean War have struggled to fit into a society
that takes prickly pride in its 99%-plus ethnic homogeneity.
Teased and bullied, 9.4% of Amerasian children drop out of elementary school;
another 17.5% quit middle school, according to Pearl S. Buck International.
As adults, more than 45% are unemployed or work odd jobs to get by, the Buck organization says.
Seven-year-old Ahn Arum, daughter of a Seoul woman and an absentee American father, refuses to study Korean at school.
"She doesn't know why she should read Korean. She doesn't feel Korean," says her mother, Ahn Jin-hee, 29.
"The boys tease her. They say she has curly hair; she is black; she is smelly. (Even) my parents didn't want to take their granddaughter outside because it was disgraceful."
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/steelers/2006-04-09-ward-focus_x.htm?POE=SPOISVA


In a country that's more than 99 percent ethnic Korean

with an emphasis on "pure blood" lineage,
Ward's triumphant return has caused many to re-examine prejudices against biracial children,
who are often associated with brothels around American military bases.

Cho Yong-Sun, 11, is a shy young boy. But that's not why he has no friends at school.
"No one will play with me because they say I look like an American," he says.

It's that kind of mind set that Ward hopes to change.

The only workplace where being a biracial Korean is an exotic plus is in a nightclub, which is where James Lee sings.
Lee gave up his dreams of being a soccer player as a young child, when his coach told him no team would take on a player who looked the way he did.
Tired of being teased, he dropped out of high school,
and he knows what his future will look like.
"I have seen many others go down this path," says Lee.
"We don't have an education, all we know is singing at a night club.
When we get older, people like me do menial labor, with a hat pulled over our faces."
Wednesday, April 12, 2006
http://edition.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/asiapcf/04/11/skorea.ward/

Cooperation & Dev. for Korean/American Women

Monday, 3 April 2006, 11:23 am
Speech: US State Department
Alexander Vershbow, U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea
Remarks to 2006 Korean Women Entrepreneurs Association Breakfast Seminar
Renaissance Hotel, Seoul, Korea
March 21, 2006

I am humbled, actually, as I am not Korean, I am not a woman, nor I am an entrepreneur. I am, however, getting some help on the Korean part.
In case you have not heard, I have recently been given an honorary Korean name.
For those of you who find it difficult to say Vershbow, just call me "Park Bo-woo." I'm told that I'm first Park from the Sejong District Park clan.
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO0604/S00026.htm


korean apartment owners violated Fair Housing Act

http://www.lawfinders.com/pdf/Complaint.pdf
The owner had, according to some evidence, made statements that he did not like African-Americans
or Hispanic tenants, but preferred Korean tenants.
The Fair Housing Act prohibits "making, printing or publishing 'any notice,
statement, or advertisement, with rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference,

discriminated against Plaintiff SMITH and other African-Americans by printing and distributing
fliers indicating a preference for Koreans and Korean-Americans.
Such marketing discriminates against all non-Korean

discriminated against Plaintiff SMITH, based upon his race,
by falsely representing theunavailabilityof apartments at The Townhouse,
by refusing toallow him tocomplete an application, byrefusing torent anapartment to him,
and by excluding him from marketing that was only directedat individuals of Korean ancestry that could speak Korean.
Defendant JOHNSON, who is alsoKorean-American, solicited only Koreans and Korean-Americans in the summer of 1998
Plaintiff SMITH filed a complaint with the California Department of Fair Housing on April20, 1999. Such discrimination, denying Plaintiff
section 1021.5 of the California Code of Civil Procedure because this action involves the enforcement of an important right affecting the public interest,
namely access to low-income apartment housing at The Townhouse by all individuals not of Korean ancestry.
http://www.lawfinders.com/pdf/Complaint.pdf

Racial Discrimination
Sadly we have received many reports of Teachers arriving at Incheon International Airport following being hired from their home country
  • and as soon as the school owner sees them and sees that they are NOT Caucasian,
the school owner refuses to have anything to do with them - in fact abandoning them in the airport.
http://www.efl-law.com/deceptive_practices.html


Guess Who's Coming To Dinner

(Helpful hint for South Korean government and embassy personnel -- this article contains potentially lethal doses of humor, and possibly traces of toxic substances such as irony and sarcasm. For full protection, retreat into your shell and claim diplomatic stupidity.)

By FRED VARCOE

Sydney Poitier never had this problem in the 1967 movie classic ``Guess Who's Coming To Dinner,'' in which he
played a black man invited to the home of his white, middle-
class American girlfriend.

Poitier's problem was one of color rather than culture.
After all, his character was essentially from the same cul
ture as that of the white family. Everyone was American
and they all spoke the same language, although it might
be argued that they spoke different shades of English.

If Poitier had been visiting a Korean girlfriend's home,
then the pair of them would have been dead -- figuratively, perhaps literally -- within seconds.

At least the Koreans don't differentiate between blacks
and whites; to them, they're all ``niggers.''

People say the same kind of prejudice exists in Japan and cite the use of the word ``gaijin'' as proof. But gaijin is really a tame word as used by most Japanese and the Japanese themselves are basically no more or less prejudiced than Americans or Europeans.

The Koreans, though, are a completely different matter.
Even if you are a Korean planning to get married in Korea, your family register will be checked and if there's any evidence of undesirability (e.g. mental instability, criminals, sexual deviancy, living in a different
town, not being called Kim, Park or Lee, etc.) then you're
out of contention. Parental approval is a serious issue.

If Joe Foreigner wants to marry a Korean, he should first go to a leper colony to see how he'll be treated.

This is not just a matter of conjecture. On the first day I visited my Korean girlfriend in Seoul three years ago, a middle-aged man approached me in the grounds of the national museum and informed me in English that holding
hands was a disgrace in Korea and was ``not allowed.''

Phew, I thought, that was close; cultural clangers I
don't need. But as we moved into the city center, I noticed
that quite a few Korean couples were linked physically,
i.e. they were holding hands. Middle-aged man must be
mistaken, I thought.

A few days later, we were on a crowded bus. I sat down
and invited my girlfriend to sit on my knee, partly so she
would be more comfortable, partly so I would be more
comfortable and partly to make more room on the bus.

Within a short space of time, a youngish, besuited
chap pushed his way down the bus and informed me in excellent English: ``I feel I should inform you that your behavior could cause considerable offense.
This kind of thing is not done in Korea. It is not wise for her to be sitting like this; it's against Korean culture.''

Alright, I thought, this time I have a response.

``Tell her,'' I retorted. ``She's Korean. She must
know Korean culture. Tell her it's wrong.'' Young man mere
ly repeated his opening gambit.

A few days later, my gal and I were walking up a hill
opposite the Hilton Hotel when a 50-something woman
popped out of her cubbyhole and started screaming some
thing at my girlfriend in Korean.

``What's she saying?'' I asked.

``Prostitute! Prostitute! Prostitute!'' my girlfriend re
plied without emotion.

It was a relief to find out that my girlfriend's sister,
who lives in Shinjuku, was normal. But . . .

On one of my girlfriend's first visits to Tokyo after our relationship had started, we were invited to dinner at her Shinjuku sister's apartment. Also invited were Meg
umi, the girl who introduced us, and her boyfriend, Paul.
But there was a proviso.

``Don't mention our relationship to my sister's hus
band,'' my girlfriend implored. ``You're just a friend -- of Megumi's.''

The Korean husband was a nice enough fellow, spoke
English and was obviously an earnest chap. He didn't seem
like the sort of person who would throw me off the balco
ny if I was going out with his sister-in-law.

And he wasn't. But apparently he comes from a family
of devil worshippers that my girlfriend's family disap
proves of, so handing them ammunition in the form of a
tainted member of the family (i.e. my girlfriend) was out of the question.

Thank God my girlfriend's family is different, I
thought -- prematurely.

I had met her lone brother and four of her five sisters.
They were remarkably nice people. But mother and father
were still completely in the dark about our relationship, until her youngest sister invited us to her wedding
in her hometown of Taegu. It was ``coming out'' time.

Or, to put it another way, it was time for me to have her mother kick me in the balls and slam the closet doors
back in my face.

As soon as I got to the wedding hall, the matriarch
turned. Not on me, but on everybody else. It's a neat tac
tic. Make everyone feel bad and then everyone will want
the source of the badness to get the hell out. My girl
friend's sisters were still friendly, but no one had the
power to resist the unstoppable force of a stormtrooping
Korean matriarch.

I was told to stand at the back of the wedding hall with
the implication being that 10 km back would be just fine.

I retired to the wedding palace (supermarket, more like) coffee shop where, among the swarms of Koreans, I tried in vain not to look like a 185-cm white clown. My girlfriend found me and suggested we went to eat at a nearby restaurant. There, her Shinjuku sister and their brother came to pay their respects while my girlfriend went off to pay her's to her sister and her family. She also unwisely tried to break the ice with her mother on my
behalf.

She came back in tears. As Taegu rejected us, so we
turned our backs on Taegu and headed back to Seoul,
tails between our legs.
http://www.fccj.or.jp/modules/wfsection/article.php?category=34&articleid=184


良く不法滞在者の親などを、

国外退去処分にして、 色々家族を引き裂くのかとか言われたりするけど、そんなのは何処の国でもやってる。

その例
http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050920/NEWS09/509200427
Since watching his parents board a plane for Korea more than a month ago, Andrew Jung has tried to live a normal life.
But after his parents were deported Aug. 11, life has been anything but normal for Andrew.
Dae and Young Jung were forced to leave their West Toledo home and return to South Korea in August after living here since 1984.
The family's life was torn apart in February, when immigration officials went to their home and ar-rested the couple.
Mr. Jung was released to care for their son, who was born in America; Mrs. Jung was held in various jails.
"The Jungs serve as a great example of how these immigration laws aren't working," said Eun Sook Lee, executive director of the National Korean American Service & Education Consortium.


Guess Who's Coming To Dinner

By FRED VARCOE
Sydney Poitier never had this problem in the 1967 movie classic ``Guess Who's Coming To Dinner,'' in which he
played a black man invited to the home of his white, middle-class American girlfriend.

Poitier's problem was one of color rather than culture.
After all, his character was essentially from the same culture as that of the white family. Everyone was American
and they all spoke the same language, although it might be argued that they spoke different shades of English.

If Poitier had been visiting a Korean girlfriend's home,
then the pair of them would have been dead -- figuratively, perhaps literally -- within seconds.

At least the Koreans don't differentiate between blacks and whites; to them, they're all ``niggers.''

People say the same kind of prejudice exists in Japan and cite the use of the word ``gaijin'' as proof. But gaijin is really a tame word as used by most Japanese and the Japanese themselves are basically no more or less prejudiced than Americans or Europeans.

The Koreans, though, are a completely different matter.
Even if you are a Korean planning to get married in Korea, your family register will be checked and if there's any evidence of undesirability (e.g. mental instability, criminals, sexual deviancy, living in a different town, not being called Kim, Park or Lee, etc.) then you're out of contention. Parental approval is a serious issue.

If Joe Foreigner wants to marry a Korean, he should first go to a leper colony to see how he'll be treated.

This is not just a matter of conjecture. On the first day I visited my Korean girlfriend in Seoul three years ago, a middle-aged man approached me in the grounds of the national museum and informed me in English that holding
hands was a disgrace in Korea and was ``not allowed.''

Phew, I thought, that was close; cultural clangers I don't need. But as we moved into the city center, I noticed
that quite a few Korean couples were linked physically,
i.e. they were holding hands. Middle-aged man must be mistaken, I thought.

A few days later, we were on a crowded bus. I sat down and invited my girlfriend to sit on my knee, partly so she
would be more comfortable, partly so I would be more comfortable and partly to make more room on the bus.

Within a short space of time, a youngish, besuited chap pushed his way down the bus and informed me in excellent English: ``I feel I should inform you that your behavior could cause considerable offense.
This kind of thing is not done in Korea. It is not wise for her to be sitting like this; it's against Korean culture.''

Alright, I thought, this time I have a response.

``Tell her,'' I retorted. ``She's Korean. She must know Korean culture. Tell her it's wrong.'' Young man merely repeated his opening gambit.

A few days later, my gal and I were walking up a hill opposite the Hilton Hotel when a 50-something woman
popped out of her cubbyhole and started screaming something at my girlfriend in Korean.

``What's she saying?'' I asked.

``Prostitute! Prostitute! Prostitute!'' my girlfriend replied without emotion.

It was a relief to find out that my girlfriend's sister, who lives in Shinjuku, was normal. But . . .

On one of my girlfriend's first visits to Tokyo after our relationship had started, we were invited to dinner at her Shinjuku sister's apartment. Also invited were Megumi, the girl who introduced us, and her boyfriend, Paul.
But there was a proviso.

``Don't mention our relationship to my sister's husband,'' my girlfriend implored. ``You're just a friend -- of Megumi's.''

The Korean husband was a nice enough fellow, spoke English and was obviously an earnest chap.
He didn't seem like the sort of person who would throw me off the balcony if I was going out with his sister-in-law.

And he wasn't. But apparently he comes from a family of devil worshippers that my girlfriend's family disapproves of, so handing them ammunition in the form of a tainted member of the family (i.e. my girlfriend) was out of the question.

Thank God my girlfriend's family is different, I thought -- prematurely.

I had met her lone brother and four of her five sisters.
They were remarkably nice people. But mother and father were still completely in the dark about our relationship, until her youngest sister invited us to her wedding in her hometown of Taegu. It was ``coming out'' time.

Or, to put it another way, it was time for me to have her mother kick me in the balls and slam the closet doors
back in my face.

As soon as I got to the wedding hall, the matriarch turned. Not on me, but on everybody else. It's a neat tactic.
Make everyone feel bad and then everyone will want the source of the badness to get the hell out.
My girl friend's sisters were still friendly, but no one had the power to resist the unstoppable force of a stormtrooping
Korean matriarch.

I was told to stand at the back of the wedding hall with the implication being that 10 km back would be just fine.

I retired to the wedding palace (supermarket, more like) coffee shop where, among the swarms of Koreans, I tried in vain not to look like a 185-cm white clown. My girlfriend found me and suggested we went to eat at a nearby restaurant. There, her Shinjuku sister and their brother came to pay their respects while my girlfriend went off to pay her's to her sister and her family. She also unwisely tried to break the ice with her mother on my behalf.

She came back in tears. As Taegu rejected us, so we turned our backs on Taegu and headed back to Seoul,
tails between our legs.

``My mother is just conservative,'' my girlfriend tried to explain on the long bus ride back to the South Korean capital.

``No, she's just ignorant,'' I pointed out. ``Has she even met a foreigner?''

``Er, no,'' my girlfriend meekly replied.

The next day I flew back to Tokyo with the Shinjuku sister (by special request so I could help control her three children on the journey home) and she advised me that the ice had been broken.

``You exist in her mind now, so you've made the first step,'' she told me.

It seemed like one step forward and 50 steps backward to me. I've been around the world a bit, but I'd never experienced such entrenched and blind prejudice as I found in South Korea. There were probably mature ways to react to it, but I wasn't particularly interested in them at the time.

My first reaction was to ask my girlfriend to marry me out of shear spite for her mother.
Common sense actually got the better of me on that occasion, but it seemed an attractive prospect, especially as I wasn't planning on inviting the old battleaxe to the wedding.

My second reaction was to tell my girlfriend in no uncertain terms that I would never voluntarily meet or speak to her mother as long as I lived -- or, hopefully, as long as she lived.

But perhaps my girlfriend had the best reaction (no, not that, but it was fun kissing and making up when we
hadn't actually had an argument): She asked me to marry her.
How forward, I thought. Whatever will I tell my mother.


Foreign Spouses in Korea Speak Out on Their Right 07-03-2005 20:08

Kristine (not her real name), a 25-year-old Filipina, decided to run away from her Korean husband of five years after he tried to strangle her last April. She endured years of occasional physical abuse,
but could no longer live with a man who nearly killed her.
The petition proposed that the Korean government create a special body or court to hear cases of foreign wives who file cases of domestic violence or marital rape against their husbands.
These cases may seem extreme, but these cases of abuse and hardship are not unique to Filipina wives of Korean men. There are dozens of foreign wives,
whether Chinese or Vietnamese or other nationalities, who ran away after having experienced physical and verbal abuse at the hands of their Korean husbands.
Others may have found themselves divorced and alone in Korea, and living in fear of being deported.
Among the common complaints from the Filipina wives are domestic violence, forced sex, threats of deportation and lack of financial support.



Half foreign wife-Korean husband households live in poverty

Korea Herald Jul 14, 2005
More than half the foreign wife-Korean husband households are in absolute poverty,
earning below the minimum cost of living, and only 10 percent of them benefit from the state subsidy programs,
according to a survey released yesterday.
The study, commissioned by the Ministry of Health and Welfare to keep abreast of the burgeoning ranks of
female married migrants, was the first nationwide survey on the welfare conditions of foreign wives

S Korea 'more hostile' for foreign staff

Teachers organise to counter poor treatment and a tarnished image, reports Liz Ford.

Friday June 24, 2005
Guardian Weekly

English-language teachers in South Korea are to set up a national union to counter a backlash against foreign workers. Last month delegates at a conference organised by Asian EFL Journal, attended by some 400 teachers, agreed to press ahead with "long overdue" plans to establish a union in order to protect teachers' rights. The union would be the first of its kind for English language teachers in the country.
An official from the ministry of labour told Learning English that any foreigners working in the country legally had the right to unionise. English teachers who work on government education programmes are already entitled to join the union for native Korean teachers, although applying can be a long process.

The move has been prompted by recent attacks on the profession in Korea. A documentary that portrayed English teachers as lazy and unqualified, broadcast on national television earlier this year, coupled with salacious comments about where to meet Korean women, discovered on the talkboards of a website specifically for English teachers - Englishspectrum.com - caused widespread consternation in the local press and sparked an online petition to keep foreigners out of the country.

This was followed in March by the high-profile arrest of two Canadian teachers who were jailed and later deported following a fight outside a bar in Seoul. One of the Canadian teachers was believed to be working in the country illegally.

The Korean government has been on a mission to expel illegal foreign workers for some time. Although the justice ministry denies there is a renewed crackdown, there does seem to be a more concerted effort to clean up the ELT sector, with raids on schools and the arrest of owners and teachers.